Jesus Christ v. Eternal Principles

At the beginning of Unlocking Romans, I reflected on how Christians have, at times, defined God. Scrolling through Augustine, Anselm, and the Westminster Confession, I summarized thus: Not only do these Christian definitions, like their Greek philosophical counterparts, all focus on a g/God who is wholly other, they also define God in universal terms without […]

Election and Grace

The history of the doctrine of predestination has at times viewed humanity as the recipients of a stark dual decree of God: some are predestined to life, others to destruction. As Karl Barth lays out his project for a revisionist assessment of the notion of election, he demands that the focus of election be the […]

God is One

If there is a central faith confession in ancient Israel, it is that God is one. Well, at least, God alone is Israel’s God, which then gradually becomes, the only true and living God. But let’s not quibble over the historical development from henotheism to monotheism. Because, after all, as Barth reminds us in Church […]

Mercy and Righteousness

Not entirely unrelated to the weekend’s posts on how sacrificial death might benefit the people of God, Karl Barth wants us to hear that the mercy and righteousness of God are not two competing qualities. God is merciful in God’s righteousness. And God is righteous in God’s mercy (§30.2). How can we know that God […]

Our Sin in God

Karl Barth, thoughts on our sin and God, appropriate for Holy Saturday: It is His heart, not ours, which is suffering when we think that we are the sufferers and that we have a right or obligation to lament. His heart is wounded, and wounded through our heart… Sin attains its true form as opposition […]